There’s no doubt that the coronavirus pandemic has drastically changed the way we all go about our daily lives. But because COVID-19 is such a new threat, we’re learning more about it as the pandemic rages on. Recommendations that were made back in March may not hold as true today for the simple fact that we’re discovering more about the virus — and how it spreads — as cases become more prevalent. While this can be confusing for many of us, it’s essential that we follow the guidelines laid out by leading health officials in order to protect ourselves, our loved ones, and members of our communities.

Regardless of the rules that your municipality may have in place, the use of face coverings and masks is a recommended practice for anyone who cannot maintain at least six feet of distance from others outside their home. However, you may be wondering about the actual effectiveness of face masks or have questions about whether it’s necessary for frontline workers to wear them in public. We hope this post will clear up any confusion you may have and illustrate the importance of this type of facial protection.

Do Face Masks Really Do Anything?

At the very start of the pandemic, the CDC actually made recommendations against the widespread use of face coverings and masks. However, those recommendations were amended fairly quickly once experts learned more about asymptomatic carriers and transmission. After it was discovered that infected persons could easily spread COVID-19 to others before they ever showed symptoms, national and international health organizations alike made it clear that face masks were one of several important preventative measures we can take to reduce the transmission of the novel coronavirus.

Of course, different kinds of masks offer different levels of protection. Surgical and N95 masks offer a greater level of protection than cloth masks, but masks made of cloth can be surprisingly effective in reducing the spread of disease. Recent evidence suggests that cloth masks can keep respiratory droplets and aerosols (which can easily spread the virus) from traveling to infect others. Ultimately, mask-wearing is most successful when used in tandem with other preventative measures — but it’s a step we can’t afford to overlook.

Why Should Frontline Workers Take These Extra Health Precautions?

Many of those working in public health and safety feel that it’s important for the public to see their entire faces. That may explain why law enforcement officers and other personnel nationwide have often been seen without face coverings. In other cases, frontline workers may not realize the extreme danger; they may even think that because they put their own safety on the line every day at work, they’re used to taking risks.

While it may be a valid concern that frontline workers need to make sure their faces can clearly be seen by the general public, it’s perhaps even more important to be concerned with your own health and the well-being of anyone with whom you come into contact. Those who work at the 17,985 police agencies and other public safety organizations nationwide are considered essential.

As a frontline worker, your job involves direct work with the public — and that puts you at a much higher risk for contracting COVID-19. We know that many people infected with COVID-19 won’t show symptoms for up to two weeks, while some may never show any symptoms at all. Because of that, you or someone you help could be carrying the novel coronavirus without realizing it. And since we know that face masks can make a significant difference in how COVID-19 spreads, wearing one is a way to protect yourself and others while you’re at work.

Where Can I Find Masks Specifically Designed For Frontline Workers?

Fortunately, many companies with the ability to do so have added a face mask to their product lines. We were already entrusted with making patches and pins for frontline workers — so it only makes sense that we can now make customized masks for agencies all across the country. For more information on our high-quality custom masks, please get in touch today.